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THE MAMIYA “FAST ACTION CAMERA”

According to some reports, over 740 police officers were injured in the violent riots that broke out on May Day, 1952 in Tokyo, Japan. Many police officers were injured while simply trying to take photographs of the protesters and as a result, authorities demanded a camera that would be easy to aim without raising it to the eye. The Mamiya “Fast Action Camera” was their answer. Thirty units were delivered to Osaka police headquarters in 1954 but in the trails surrounding the riots concern was raised that the Fast Action Cameras could be confused with real weapons, frightening future subjects with unpredictable results (ie. hurling stones at the photographers), and thusly, the whole idea was scrapped and the pistol cameras were never put into any real on-the-street use.

One of these turned up on E-Bay a few years ago – the asking price? $25,000. (Via)

THE CHRONOPHOTOGRAPHIC RIFLE

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The French scientist Étienne-Jules Marey created this chronophotographic rifle in 1882.

A time-lapse weapon that shot 12 frames of film in one second – allowing him the power to take wonderful pictures like this:

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The chronophotographic rifle was the reason he would eventually be saddled with the nickname “Fool of Posillipo” because people would always see the crazy bastard wandering the countryside, aiming at birds but never firing a shot.

(Images: Storia Della Fotografia)

 

 

THE DORYU 1

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Intending to create a camera specifically for the law enforcement industry, the Doryu Camera Company started work on the Doryu 1 in 1949 and had a working prototype by 1952. Unfortunately, the gun never went into production because of durability problems: the bakelite joints tended to come loose with heat, and shock-resistance was insufficient for intended use. (Via)

 

 

THE DORYU 2-16

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Undaunted, The Doryu Camera Company switched from the 9mm film they were using with the Doryu 1 (of which, there was a shortage of, at the time) and moved to 16mm with their second prototype. Like a real pistol, the Doryu 2-16 has a bullet magazine in its grip which could be loaded with six magnesium cartridges for flash photography. By the time of its release in July ’54, the powers that be had already decided that the Mamiyi “Fast Action Camera” would be the police departments camera pistol of choice so the DCC lost out on that market. Nonetheless, they sent the 2-16 into production for civilian use but sales were underwhelming and the line was discontinued in 1956. (Via)

 

 

THE MODIFIED COLT .38

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A modified Colt 38 that snaps a picture whenever you pull the trigger. At the left: six pictures taken by the camera. New York, 1938.

The crime writer within asks – “What if some deranged artist turned this into a snuff pistol by making the Colt fully functional and then used it to capture the look of surprise on his victim’s faces as they meet their bitter demise?”

Hey, don’t get any crazy ideas.

There are much easier ways to break into the art world. Like sticking your poop in a can.

(Image: The Nationaal Archief of the Netherlands)

 

 

THE TALCS

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A fully accessorized and loaded up Tactical Assault Long Range Camera Stock (TALCS) with a Nikon D200 body and a Nikkor 80-200mm telephoto lens. A fully functional “trigger” operates the shutter and auto focus.

 

 

THE KILBURN GUN CAMERA

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(Via Historic Camera)

 

 

THE MAHARAJAH’S TELESCOPIC CAMERA RIFLE

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(Via Popular Mechanics – Jun, 1950)

 

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A camera pistol (Revolver de Poche) from 1882. (Via Classic Camera Cafe Museum of Historically Important Cameras)

 

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(Via Popular Mechanics – Jul,1934)